Strategies: Part Five of the Modern Communications Plan

The strategy section is usually where people start. Resist the urge! Start with the first four steps: Identifying your vision, goals and objectives and ‘greatest accomplishment,’ your target audience and main channels. If you don’t go through those steps first, you could waste a lot of time developing a beautiful strategy that misses the mark. After all, there is no sense in engaging in a high-level strategy like social media, if you’re trying to reach someone who doesn’t use it. (Yes, those people actually exist.) Or, if they use social media, it isn’t where they go to buy insert whatever you sell here.

Common strategies include:

  • conducting media relations
  • engaging in community relations
  • launching a new community (online or in person)
  • holding events
  • attending or producing trade shows
  • launching a new “theme” for your company or industry or re-branding
  • creating your own channels (i.e. launching a magazine)
  • engaging or launching social awareness, philanthropic and corporate social responsibility programs
  • engaging in customer recognition
  • creating an awards program

Hopefully, this short list got you thinking what is possible. Next up? Tactics.

The whole communications plan template can be found here.

 

Part Four of the Modern Communications Plan: How will you get the word out?

When planning how you’re going to share your story, products and services with the world, it’s imperative to choose the right channels to do so. What channels will have the greatest probability of reaching your specific audience?

Do not be seduced by a shiny new social media platform or distribution service without understanding who it will reach.This is where the “we won’t” list comes in handy. (More on that section later.) It’s tempting to do or at least try everything—and keeping tabs on “the next big thing” is important—but you want to focus on what is working right now with your audience.

For instance, a major Facebook strategy may not be necessary if your audience is Generation Z (think current tweens and high school students). But you better familiarize yourself with Snapchat and Instagram to reach this audience. Or perhaps, you’re trying to reach Generation Y or Millennials. This also may mean you’d have to revamp your content strategy—get away from white papers, trade shows (unless you’re going to Comic Con) and print advertising and move to digital mediums like Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. Baby boomers? Try Pinterest, community media outlets, and targeted advertising.

Conduct a “deep dive” into where your target audience goes online, what they watch or monitor, and where they get their information. Then devise a strategy to use those channels.

Next up? Developing strategies and tactics.

Read the entire modern communications template here.

 

 

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How to Lose Your Reputation in One Day

A positive reputation can take years to build. That same reputation can be lost in one day.

For thirty years, I’ve advised business leaders and organizations that no amount of my public relations services can overcome bad customer service. Sadly, that advice became more real to me over the last week.

An Internet services company I have loved and referred dozens of organizations to, has been put on my “never use again” list. It took exactly one day to go from hero to zero with me and my client that they screwed.

Below is the story with names and some details removed. Why do this anonymously? I’m in the business of helping companies, not hurting them. Perhaps this company will turn itself around or make this situation right. I am not holding my breath for either. But I won’t add to the damage. As a business leader, just use this case study to be better.

Here’s the story. Three years ago, my largest client needed an Internet hosting company to host a blog for a major program. This program has grown so exponentially, it’s presence is now on CBS television. Their blog grew alongside them — until last week. The blog site just . . . disappeared. We called the hosting company, which announced it had decommissioned the server it’d been hosted on, and the blog failed to get moved to the new server. Here’s the kicker: they had no backup. You read that right. This company had no back-up of a site it hosted for three years. The site was gone. For forever.

Know what else? This blog, which was hosted elsewhere prior to moving it to this-company-that-shall-not-be-named, had years of history. All told, six years of blog posts, images and more have been lost.

Know how they responded to our angst over this? “We’re sorry. There’s nothing we can do. Here’s your several hundred dollar hosting fee you spent over the years. Goodbye.”

Our repeated requests to talk to managers and to get a better explanation than ‘oh well’ went unanswered. My client, which has an international presence and is associated with major, household brands, is now in the position of recreating the blogsite. Do you think this company will pay for the time and effort to make this happen? Nope. Not one cent has been offered, even when we asked. In fact, they refuse to talk to us. Pure radio silence.

So, there you have it. One mistake, a failure to manage your business well (what hosting company doesn’t have backups?), and a pitiful customer service response put this company not just in the doghouse but in the “worst experience ever” category.

Don’t let this be you. No public relations in the world can turn around blatant disregard and care of clients and their assets.

(Oh, and ensure back ups. You’d think that lesson would have been learned long ago.)

How Well Do You Know Who You’re Talking To? Part 3 of the Modern Communications Plan

How well do you know your target audience? Really.

In the modern communication plan, you’ll want to include detailed information about who you are trying to reach. This section can include demographic data, market research, and other information that showcases who you are communicating to.

However, the deeper you describe them, the greater your team members will be able to work with your strategies and messaging. They can get more creative, knowing that what they are doing will resonate with who they are trying to influence.

So, what is “deep?”

Rail road moving throw the hole in the big green apple 3d illustration

  • Where do they hang out online as well as in real life? That one may be easy to answer. But do you know when they are there? Pinterest attracts mostly women ages 18 to 35 and who spend an average of 80 minutes (!) with a penchant to buy (!!). They log onto Pinterest in droves on Saturday mornings. Are you there then? Online shopping has reshaped consumer-buying habits. Yet studies continually show that most people still like to visit brick and mortar stores. When does your audience do that? Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, was the largest in-person shopping day for decades. But in the last few years, Black Friday seems more like Black Anytime.

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  • What causes action? You know what you want them to do, but what causes them to click, share or buy? Better yet, what causes an “automatic buy?” Is it from peer pressure? And what does that peer pressure look like? A high number of “views” of a video spurs more sharing than a lower-viewed piece. Or is your product likely to be purchased or adopted because it has a long brand history? Older Americans tend to have strong brand loyalty. The younger generation hasn’t had time to establish brand preferences yet.

  • Speaking of age, what generation is your audience from? For the first time in history, the U.S. job force has four generations represented. The youngest, the Millennials, have completely different attitudes about work, friends and family, and community than Depression-era workers. They also want different things from life. Know these differences. Name them.

These are a few questions to ask. What else should we examine? Share in the comments section if you have more.

Greatest Accomplishment, Goals and Objectives: The Second Steps in the Modern Communications Plan

Once you have determined your vision for your effort, identifying a “greatest accomplishment” and goals and objectives should be next.

The “greatest accomplishment” section is short. It could be one line or even one word. What is the single most important communication achievement that your organization or project can achieve?

An example would be for a business or industry is to have changed a particular conversation in its marketplace or introduce a new idea. But name the change or idea. Don’t let it remain nebulous.

If you are successful, what will have occurred very specifically? Make it achievable, but also hard. Contrary to popular belief, “hard” can be quite motivating for a team if they are given sufficient resources and structure. Identify a “holy grail” moment for your team and you will have incentivized the game.

Next, identify at least three goals and objectives.

We define goals as things you reach. They are milestones such as audience numbers, a specific partnership formalized or specific media attention. Again, how will you know you are successful? Where are you now and where do you want to be? How will you know you’ve “arrived?”

Objectives are things you create, such as introducing a new conversation that takes hold in the public discourse or a certain status for your organization. What will be different if you are successful? How will your organization, your industry, a certain audience or your team be changed?

One note: We realize some people have differing definitions of goals and objectives. But these work for us and our programs. As long as your team is on the same page, you’re golden.

Part Two of the Modern Communications

Your Vision: The First Step in the Modern Communications Plan

Just like you wouldn’t go on vacation without knowing your destination, you shouldn’t launch any communications effort without knowing where you’d like to land. This is at the heart of Your Vision.

We suggest one line or up to one paragraph that shows how you want the organization, its work and its people to be known at some point in the future. Often we ask our clients these questions to help them identify their vision:

  • In five years, where do you want this organization to be? Get specific from number of employees (if any), products launched, services rendered, legacy left behind, market share and position, and even your size.
  • If you meet your business and communication goals, what will exist? In other words, what do you want to leave behind when your communications effort and projects are complete?
  • How will your target audiences be better off when you reach your goals? What problems will you have solved in five years because you succeeded?

Having a solid vision statement will help everyone keep their eyes on the prize, as the cliché goes. Without one, you could find yourself being pulled in directions that lead to nowhere.

A Template for the Modern Communications Plan

Beyond the usual strategy and tactics (reaching out to reporters, attending trade shows, etc.), what are some of the things that need to be considered as part of today’s communications planning? Below is a template that we use for planning our client’s overall communications and special projects. Throughout the summer, I’ll blog about each part, including providing questions that need your answers, tips and techniques, and identifying the big changes taking place in the world of mass communications.

1. Vision
This section is a one paragraph answer to how the organization wants to be known. Or, if it is a project, what do we want to leave behind when the project is complete? An example would be for a nonprofit organization to be the “go to” source on all things related to their cause.

2. Goals and Objectives
This section differs from the greatest accomplishment in that goals are things you reach (milestones such as audience numbers) and objectives are things you create (happenings from new conversations and ways of thinking to a certain status).

2a. Our Greatest Accomplishment
This section highlights the single most important communication accomplishment that the organization or project can achieve. An example would be for an organization to have changed a particular conversation in its marketplace or to introduce a new idea.

3. Target Audience
This section can include demographic data, market research, and other information that showcases who you are communicating to.

4. Main Communications Channels
This section should describe the main channels (social channels, traditional, media outlets, events and shows and more) that you are going to use to push our your information, thought leadership and ideas.

5. Strategies
This section discusses the main strategies employed and why. Employing social media, engaging in media relations, community relations, holding events, launching a new “theme” for your industry — these are some tried-and-true strategies you’ll find in a plan.

6. Main Tactics
This section is the action plan. It answers what you are going to do on a daily, weekly and monthly basis to move the communications effort forward. Hold contests on Facebook? Develop a PSA series? Provide stakeholders with toolkits to help spread the word? this section houses the details.

7. “We Won’t” List
This section does precisely what the title says. Knowing what you will not focus your attention on (but could) is vital to ensuring focus.

8. Content Strategy
The section addresses how you are going to assess, develop and manage the ideas, thoughts and content you will use to direct conversations, viewpoints and reputation and image.

9. Positioning, Messaging & Storytelling
This section should include your message guide, from a positioning statement, value proposition to spotlight pitch on the organization or project. It sets the message tone so everyone is clear on what you are going to say and how.

10. Monitoring & Measurement
This section, one of the most well-intentioned but often ignored areas, will go into how to tell how you are doing and how to share that with managers, executive teams and other stakeholders.

11. Team Players.
This section will identify – by name – who is going to design and implement the plan.

12. Timeline.
How are you going to ensure your company will use it? There is no sense in having a communications plan if you aren’t going to use it, so plan out your activities. Set dates.

Lucky number 13: How much money are you willing to spend? The reason there is no formal section above is because, in my 30 years of experience, every organization is different around money. Some know exactly how much they want to spend and will tell you up front. Others wish to see a plan with a budget attached before making a decision. Regardless, began to talk about money early and as the above template unfolds. The plan will usually tell you how much you need to spend to be effective. Decisions can be made from there.

A Great Spokesperson Goes Beyond Knowing The Message

Identifying the “right” spokesperson is a big topic in the board room when public relations campaigns and social media efforts are discussed. And, usually the CEO or someone else with a big job title is named. After all, they come with the clout and cache, right?

Not necessarily. A job title does not necessarily make the person the best representative of the message or brand.

It should go without saying that the chosen someone should know the message and story and be able to answer questions related to the topic at hand. But, that’s not the only skill required. Great message deliverer also has the following characteristics.

  • They are likeable. People are attracted to the messages of people they like. So, unless the story calls for being outraged, putting someone before a microphone or behind a podium that will make the audience uncomfortable isn’t wise. Rarely do you want someone who is confrontational, angry or sarcastic to lead the charge. You want someone who can figuratively bond with the audience.
  • They have the appropriate energy for the topic, the brand and the audience. Just like you wouldn’t put someone who talks like a 22 year old professional skateboarder before a group of Wall Street investors (unless they are selling stock for a skateboarding company), you want to make sure the audience can related to said spokesperson. You want a spokesperson who can inspire and make audience members (even the audience of one) feel a certain way.
  • They demonstrate real interest in their audience. There is no faster way to turn off a reporter or an audience than to act bored or disinterested. Why should someone care about someone who doesn’t seem to care about them?

What else do you believe a good spokesperson should have to move an audience to action?

Ami Neiberger-Miller Joins Four Leaf Public Relations as Senior Counselor

Ami Neiberger-MillerWe are a fortunate group at Four Leaf Public Relations. Today, we have the pleasure of introducing a new virtual team member: senior counselor Ami Neiberger-Miller, APR. A seasoned public relations consultant, Ami brings a strong background and more than twenty years of experience in helping businesses and associations take the next step in sharing who they are and what they want to do.

Ami’s areas of expertise include: designing and managing strategic communications and outreach campaigns; providing strategic counsel for tough situations and messaging development; developing and integrating content creation with media relations and writing for web copy, news releases, event scripting, educational curriculum, professional training, and more.

Ami has written for PRSA’s Tactics and other publications on news coverage and crisis. She has spoken at Columbia University and the Carter Center on media coverage and trauma. She has been interviewed by CNN, CBS Sunday Morning, ABC World News, and NPR. She’s been around!

Ami is also a public relations strategist, writer and consultant at Steppingstone LLC and a public affairs and media relations officer at Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS).  In the past Ami has been a special projects consultant and writer at National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC); a member of  the board of directors and chair of the public relations working group at Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter/Loudoun Citizens for Social Justice (LAWS/LCSJ) and the communications director at Sister Cities International.

Welcome, Ami!

 

 

 

Why Virgin America Might Not Need PR

Business travel is no fun. The hassle of airline security, long lines at rental car counters and hotel check-ins killed the glamour of travel years ago. But recently I had the good fortune to fly on Virgin America cross country. It was my first experience traveling on that airline (sitting on hands to not make a bad joke here), and now I’m wondering what took me so long.

For those of you have flown Virgin many times will not find my experience particularly revolutionary. But for me that trip contrasted sharply with my usual travel experience. For days I reflected on why the experience was so much better than the “others.”

Was it because I could order food and drink at any time from my seat via my own personal embedded video monitor? No matter I paid $8.25 for a small fruit and cheese plate. I ordered it from my seat, when I wanted to. No food and beverage cart service.

Could it have been the catchy rap-fueled safety message also delivered via video? For the first time since I was twelve years old, I listened to the safety spiel because, well, it was fun.

Or could my great experience have been heightened by the modern music at the ticket counter? The red and purple neon lighting along the floor board? The extra seat room even in economy class?

Or the fact the pilot’s voice joked with us during a turbulent moment, asking us to fasten our seat belts — after we peeled ourselves off the ceiling, of course?

That was it. The people. From the person behind the ticket counter to the flight attendants I encountered real people—relaxed people. They were pleasant with us at the gate, during the flight, and even when we stood six people deep in the back, essentially blocking the crew’s maneuverability. Not once did I feel corralled like cattle going to auction. In fact, there was a notable lack of “herding.”

Virgin avoided regiment without forgetting there are still rules to flying. I felt like we were all in this together. We were all trying to get somewhere—passengers to destinations, and an airline to profitability. My experience tells me they are succeeding in every way.

I don’t know if Virgin has much public relations help, or even if they need it. But I do know, I’ll fly with them again, even when it means sacrificing frequent flier miles with another airline. Feeling like a human being who is dealing with other human beings is worth it.

Next time you think you have a public relations problem consider you might have a customer experience problem. Ask yourself, how do your customers feel when they’ve arrived?