How Storytelling Can Help You

Storytelling, the art and science of sharing information via narrative, is an ancient form of communication. Human beings around the world have used storytelling to get their ideas across for a millennia. Over the ages, it has outlasted every fad, technique and notion around persuasion and discussion. And, there is a good reason for this. It works.

People are biologically hard-wired to respond to a good story. Neuroscientists have conducted brain scans on people while delivering information to them in various forms – facts, figures, stories, visuals. They discovered that facts – like product features described in a corporate binder — only reach 5 percent of a person’s brain. And, when information is shared in a narrative, it is transferred from short term memory to long term memory.*

Narratives also persuade and motivate people to act. Think about every car commercial you’ve ever seen – the sleek design zipping around a coastline with moonlight gleaming off the hood. They sell the experience of driving the car, not the new design of the steering wheel or the size of the tires. Or, what about news reports during a catastrophe like the Sandy Hook elementary school shootings, showing the local people devastated and in shock? They didn’t lead with how many classrooms were entered or the background of the shooter. Storytelling is powerful because narratives engage our robust capacity for imagination (Life could be better if I just had that new car.) and empathy (An elementary school massacre is unacceptable.).

But, how storytelling is going to help you? Whether storytelling is for entertainment purposes, educational purposes or persuasion, story is the most powerful communication tool you have. When trying to get across an idea, sell a product or service, or introduce a new strategy or way of doing something, a key question people often ask is “Why?” “Why should we do it that way?” “Why should we listen to you?” “Why are we offering that course in that way?” A story best answers these “Why?” questions because it tells us what caused the change and what’s going to happen next. A story provides context and makes it meaningful.

The more we identify with the characters and are familiar with the setting or events in a story, the more we absorb the meaning and remember the message or moral. (My Uncle had a car like that. I’ve always wanted to drive along the Pacific Coast. Maybe we should rethink how we approach gun control and mental health.) We even start thinking like the person who is telling the story. (Yes, I should have that car! I’m going to push for mental health care reform!)

Introduce storytelling into your communication and you will be heard more often, remembered, and create a greater connection to the people you are talking to. And, even more importantly, they will begin to think like you.

*John Medina, Brain Rules

 

Proving Yourself In Messaging and Storytelling

Seth Godin is an inspirational guy on any day. But his blog post today hit a nerve. It was one line that encouraged me to write: “Proof is only useful if it leads to belief.”

His post made me think of the messaging and storytelling sessions I’ve had with clients over the last 27 years of being in the public relations business. This is what I hear (often):

  •  “But, the science proves they [insert nemesis of choice] are wrong!”
  • “Look at these statistics!”
  • “Those aren’t the facts. [Insert spreadsheet] are the facts.”

Instead of layering in those facts that you believe are so compelling — and therefore must be swaying people — know this: You can come armed with all your data crunchers, spreadsheets, experts and star witnesses, but that doesn’t mean whoever you are trying to influence believes you. They might stop arguing. But, that neutralizes the conversation at best. It doesn’t necessarily convert them into customers, advocates or allies.

This is why we urge organizations and professionals to incorporate storytelling into their communications mix. Storytelling puts those proof points into context. A straight fact may seem it’s better than any statement dripping with opinion, emotion and fun. But, if your proof point is so far afield of what they are hearing elsewhere, expect some disbelief.

Next time you are trying to influence someone, ask yourself this question instead: Will they believe what this piece of data says? If the answer is maybe not, there is more work to do.

Starting Off The New Year Right

Happy new year to you and yours! At Four Leaf, we make a habit of starting off each new year in retrospect. What worked? What didn’t? How did our outcomes for clients compare to the year before? Did anything take us by surprise? If we could anything over, what would it be, and why?

As you wrap up 2012 and start fresh this month, what questions will be you be asking yourself? January is a terrific time to conduct a communications audit, especially if you haven’t taken stock of the image you are portraying, the reputation you’ve been building, and the stories you’ve been telling – even indirectly – over the last 12 months.

  1. What are the top 5 stories about you or you company that you tried to tell in 2012? How were they received? Did they impact your brand or reputation?
  2. How did your media coverage, social media presence, thought leadership and marketing outreach fare compared to the year prior? Did you see an increased number of conversations, media mentions and requests for more information?
  3. Do your stories and messages, graphic identity and marketing outreach activities “match” and support one another? Or did everything grow “organically and you now have a patchwork quilt?
  4. Do you know who you are trying to reach? And, how did you inform them of your business?
  5. How did your communications effort fare against the competitor’s communications?

Answer these five questions and you’ll be on your way to better understanding where you should invest in communications (or not) in 2013.